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To help customers understanding better website terminology, whtop.com is maintaining (and growing) the best hosting glossary section explaining different types of terms used in webhosting industry.

Website Hosting Glossary

ActiveX
ActiveX is Microsoft technology used for developing reusable object oriented software components. ActiveX is an alternate name for OLE automation, not a separate technology. While the term "Automation" refers to the overall technology, "ActiveX" refers to the objects that can be created and manipulated using Automation.Due to Internet Explorer and Visual Basic's popularity in the late 1990s, many people incorrectly assume that all of ActiveX is related to ActiveX controls. An ActiveX control is a special type of ActiveX object that is designed to be used similar to a plugin. The most common use of ActiveX controls is to build plugins for Internet ...

AJAX
AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML), or Ajax, is a web development technique used for creating interactive web applications. The intent is to make web pages feel more responsive by exchanging small amounts of data with the server behind the scenes so that the entire web page does not have to be reloaded each time the user requests a change. This is intended to increase the web page's interactivity, speed, functionality, and usability.AJAX is asynchronous in that extra data is requested from the server and loaded in the background without interfering with the display and behaviour of the existing page. JavaScript is the scripting language in ...

Anonymous FTP
A host which provides an FTP service may additionally provide Anonymous FTP access as well. Under this arrangement, users do not strictly need an account on the host. Instead the user typically enters 'anonymous' or 'ftp' when prompted for username. Although users are commonly asked to send their email address as their password, little to no verification is actually performed on the supplied data.As modern FTP clients typically hide the anonymous login process from the user, the ftp client will supply dummy data as the password (since the user's email address may not be known to the application). For example, the following ftp user agents specify the listed passwords for ...

Apache
Apache HTTP ServerThe Apache HTTP Server, commonly referred to simply as Apache, is a web server notable for playing a key role in the initial growth of the World Wide Web. Apache was the first viable alternative to the Netscape Communications Corporation web server (currently known as Sun Java System Web Server), and has since evolved to rival other Unix-based web servers in terms of functionality and performance. Since April 1996 Apache has been the most popular HTTP server on the World Wide Web; as of March 2007 Apache served 58% of all websites.The project's name was chosen for two reasons: out of respect for the Native American Indian tribe of Apache ...

Autoresponder
An autoresponder is a computer program that automatically answers e-mail sent to it. They can be very simple or quite complex.The first autoresponders were created within mail transfer agents that found they could not deliver an e-mail to a given address. These create bounce messages such as "your e-mail could not be delivered because..." type responses. Today's autoresponders need to be careful to not generate e-mail backscatter, which can result in the autoresponses being considered E-mail spam.Autoresponders are often used as e-mail marketing tools, to immediately provide information to their prospective customers and then follow-up with them at preset ...

Bandwidth
Bandwidth is the difference between the upper and lower cutoff frequencies of for example a filter, a communication channel or a signal spectrum, and is typically measured in hertz. Bandwidth in Hertz is a central concept in many fields, including electronics, information theory, radio communications, signal processing, and spectroscopy.In computer networking literature, digital bandwidth often refers to data rate measured in bit/s, for example channel capacity (digital bandwidth capacity) or throughput (digital bandwidth consumption). The reason for this usage is that the channel capacity in bit/s is proportional to the analogue bandwidth in Hertz according to Hartley's ...

BIND
BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Domain, previously: Berkeley Internet Name Daemon) is the most commonly used DNS server on the Internet, especially on Unix-like systems, where it is a de facto standard. Supported by Internet Systems Consortium. BIND was originally created by four graduate students with CSRG at the University of California, Berkeley and first released with 4.3BSD.Paul Vixie started maintaining it in 1988 while working for DEC.A new version of BIND (BIND 9) was written from scratch in part to address the architectural difficulties with auditing the earlier BIND code bases, and also to support DNSSEC (DNS Security Extensions). Other ...

ClamAV
Clam AntiVirus (ClamAV), is a widely used free antivirus software toolkit for Unix-like operating systems. It is mainly used with a mail exchange server as a server-side email virus scanner. ClamAV is open source software distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). Both ClamAV and its updates are made available free of charge. Sourcefire, a maker of intrusion detection products and the owner of Snort, announced on Friday, August 17th, 2007 that the company had acquired the trademarks and copyrights to ClamAV from five key developers.ClamAV is generally configured to automatically update ...

Clustered Hosting
Clustered hosting technology is designed to eliminate the problems inherent with typical shared hosting infrastructures. This technology provides customers with a "clustered" handling of security, load balancing, and necessary website resources.A clustered hosting platform is data-driven, which means that no human interaction is needed to provision a new account to the platform.Clustered hosting "virtualizes" the resources beyond the limits of one physical server, and as a result, a website is not limited to one server. They share the processing power of many servers and their applications are distributed in real-time. This means that ...

ColdFusion
ColdFusion is an application server and software development framework used for the development of computer software in general, and dynamic web sites in particular. In this regard, ColdFusion is a similar product to Microsoft ASP.NET, Java Enterprise Edition or PHP.Overview The primary distinguishing feature of ColdFusion is its associated scripting language, ColdFusion Markup Language (CFML), which compares to JSP, ASP.NET, or PHP and resembles HTML in syntax. "ColdFusion" is often used synonymously with "CFML", but it should be noted that there are additional CFML application servers besides ...

Colocation Centre
A colocation centre (collocation center) ("colo") or carrier hotel is a type of data center where multiple customers locate network, server and storage gear and interconnect to a variety of telecommunications and other network service provider(s) with a minimum of cost and complexity.Increasingly organizations are recognizing the benefits of colocating their mission-critical equipment within a data centre. Colocation is becoming popular because of the time and cost savings a company can realize as result of using shared data centre infrastructure. Significant benefits of scale (large power and mechanical systems) result in large colocation facilities, ...

Computer cluster
A computer cluster is a group of tightly coupled computers that work together closely so that in many respects they can be viewed as though they are a single computer. The components of a cluster are commonly, but not always, connected to each other through fast local area networks. Clusters are usually deployed to improve performance and/or availability over that provided by a single computer, while typically being much more cost-effective than single computers of comparable speed or availability.Cluster categorizationsHigh-availability (HA) clustersHigh-availability clusters (also known as failover clusters) are implemented primarily for the purpose of ...

Data Transmission
Data transmission is the conveyance of any kind of information from one space to another. Historically this could be done by courier, a chain of bonfires or semaphores, and later by Morse code over copper wires.In recent web hosting terms, it means sending a stream of bits or bytes from one location to another using any number of technologies, such as copper wire, optical fiber, laser, radio, or infra-red light. Practical examples include moving data from one storage device to another and accessing a website, which involves data transfer from web servers to a user's browser.A related concept to data transmission is the data transmission protocol used to make the data ...

Dead link
A dead link or broken link is a link on the world wide web that points to a web page or server that is permanently unavailable. The most common result of a dead link is a 404 error, which indicates that the web server responded, but the specific page could not be found. The browser may also return a DNS error indicating that a web server could not be found at that domain name. A link might also be dead because of some form of blocking such as content filters or firewalls.Another type of dead link is a URL that points to a site unrelated to the content sought. This can sometimes occur when a domain name is allowed to lapse, and is subsequently reregistered by another ...

Dedicated Hosting
A dedicated hosting service, dedicated server, or managed hosting service is a type of Internet hosting where the client leases an entire server not shared with anyone. This is more flexible than shared hosting, as organizations have full control over the server(s), including choice of operating system, hardware, etc. Server administration can usually be provided by the hosting company as an add-on service. In some cases best dedicated server can offer less overhead and a larger return on investment. Dedicated servers are most often housed in data centers, similar to colocation facilities, providing redundant power sources and ...

DNS
Domain name systemOn the Internet, the Domain Name System (DNS) associates various sorts of information with so-called domain names; most importantly, it serves as the "phone book" for the Internet: it translates human-readable computer hostnames, e.g. whtop.com, into the IP addresses that networking equipment needs for delivering information. It also stores other information such as the list of mail exchange servers that accept email for a given domain. In providing a worldwide keyword-based redirection service, DNS is an essential component of contemporary Internet use.UsesThe most basic use of DNS is to translate hostnames to IP addresses. It is in very simple ...

Domain hijacking
Domain hijacking is the process by which internet domain names are stolen from the rightful registrant.Many people confuse domain hijacking with the reregistration of an expired domain by a new party. One is a legal process and one is not. Domain hijacking is theft, while if a name owner does not renew a name he or she is no longer the owner and it is available for someone else to register.Domain theft Domain theft is an aggressive form of domain hijacking that usually involves an illegal act. In most cases, identity theft is used to trick the domain registrar into allowing the hijacker to change the registration information to steal control of a domain ...

Domain Name
The most common types of domain names are hostnames that provide more memorable names to stand in for numeric IP addresses. They allow for any service to move to a different location in the topology of the Internet (or an intranet), which would then have a different IP address.By allowing the use of unique alphabetical addresses instead of numeric ones, domain names allow Internet users to more easily find and communicate with web sites and other server-based services. The flexibility of the domain name system allows multiple IP addresses to be assigned to a single domain name, or multiple domain names to be assigned to a single IP address. This means that one server may have multiple ...

Domain name registrar
A domain name registrar is a company accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) and/or by a national ccTLD authority to register Internet domain names. ICANN has authority over gTLDs, or Generic Top Level Domains. Examples of gTLDs include .com, .net and .org. ICANN does not have authority over ccTLDs, or Country Code Top-Level Domains, though it is quite common for domain name registrars to offer ccTLD registration services as well. Most official registrars provide DNS hosting service, but this is not required, and is often considered a separate service.HistoryUntil 1999, there was no ...

Domain tasting
Domain tasting is the practice of a domain name registrant using the five-day "grace period" (the Add Grace Period or AGP) at the beginning of the registration of an ICANN-regulated second-level domain to test the marketability of the domain. During this period, when a registration must be fully refunded by the domain name registry, a cost-benefit analysis is conducted by the registrant on the viability of deriving income from advertisements being placed on the domain's website.Domains that are deemed "successes" and retained in registrant's portfolio often represent domains that were previously used and have since expired, misspellings of other popular sites, or generic terms ...

Dynamic web page
Classical hypertext navigation occurs among "static" documents, and, for web users, this experience is reproduced using static web pages. However, web navigation can also provide an interactive experience that is termed "dynamic". Content (text, images, form fields, etc.) on a web page can change, in response to different contexts or conditions. There are two ways to create this kind of interactivity:Using client-side scripting to change interface behaviors within a specific web page, in response to mouse or keyboard actions or at specified timing events. In this case the dynamic behavior occurs within the presentation. Using ...

Email Hosting
An e-mail hosting service is an Internet hosting service that runs e-mail hosting plans.E-mail servers usually offer premium e-mail at a cost as opposed to advertising supported free e-mail or free webmail. E-mail hosting services thus differ from typical end-user e-mail providers such as webmail sites. They cater mostly to demanding e-mail users and Small and Mid Size (SMB) businesses that do not want to administer their own e-mail server. E-mail hosting providers allow for premium e-mail services along with custom configurations, large number of accounts and use of own domain name.Most e-mail hosting providers offer advanced premium e-mail ...

Email hub
The term Mail Hub is used to denote an MTA or system of MTAs used to route email but not act as a mail server (having no end-user email store) since there is no MUA access. Examples could include dedicated anti-SPAM appliances, anti-virus engines running on dedicated hardware, email gateways and so forth.DNS Based Mail Hub A first example for a Mail Hub consisting of a network of MTAs would be that of a typical small-to-medium size Internet service provider (ISP), or for a FOSS corporate mail system. This solution is very good for developing nation ISPs and NGOs. As well as any other low-budget but high availability mail ...

File Hosting
A file hosting service, online file storage service, or online media center is an Internet hosting service specifically designed to host static content, typically large files that are not web pages. Usualy web and FTP access is allowed and can be optimized for serving many users (as is implied by the term "hosting") or be optimized for single-user storage (as is implied by the term "storage"). Related services are video sharing, virtual storage and remote backup.UsesSoftware file hostingShareware authors often use file hosting services to serve their software (usually hosted on best dedicated ...

Firewall
A firewall is a hardware or software device which is configured to permit, deny or proxy data through a computer network which has different levels of trust.FunctionA firewall's basic task is to transfer traffic between computer networks of different trust levels. Typical examples are the Internet which is a zone with no trust and an internal network which is a zone of higher trust. A zone with an intermediate trust level, situated between the Internet and a trusted internal network, is often referred to as a "perimeter network" or Demilitarized zone (DMZ).A firewall's function within a network is similar to firewalls with fire door in building construction. In former ...

Free Hosting
A free web hosting service is a web hosting service that is free (no cost), usually advertisement-supported and of limited functionality. Best free web host will either provide a subdomain (yourname.example.com) (e.g. 50megs, Byethost, Trap17, Qupis) or a directory (www.example.com/~yourname) (e.g. GeoCities). In contrast, paid web hosts will usually provide a Second-level domain along with the hosting (www.yourname.com). Some free hosts do allow use of separately-purchased domain. Rarely, a free host may also operate as a domain name registrar, but their registry services are usually more expensive than others.A few free web hosts have a ...

FTP
FTP or File Transfer Protocol is used to transfer data from one computer to another over the Internet, or through a network.Specifically, FTP is a commonly used protocol for exchanging files over any network that supports the TCP/IP protocol (such as the Internet or an intranet). There are two computers involved in an FTP transfer: a server and a client. The FTP server, running FTP server software, listens on the network for connection requests from other computers. The client computer, running FTP client software, initiates a connection to the server. Once connected, the client can do a number of file manipulation operations such as uploading files to the server, ...

Fully qualified domain name
A fully qualified domain name (or FQDN) is an unambiguous domain name that specifies the node's position in the DNS tree hierarchy absolutely. To distinguish an FQDN from a regular domain name, a trailing period is added. ex: somehost.example.com. An FQDN differs from a regular domain name by its absoluteness; a suffix will not be added.For example, given a device with a hostname of "myhost" and a domain name of "example.com", the fully qualified domain name is "myhost.example.com.". It therefore uniquely defines the device whilst there might be many hosts in the world called "myhost", there can only be one "myhost.example.com.".Notice that there is a dot at ...

Game server hosting
A game server is usually a dedicated hosting server used by game clients. Any video game played over the internet generally requires a connection to a game server.How it works Data is sent from the game client to the game server, from there the game server processes the data and sends it back out to the client or clients. Game servers often require large amounts of bandwidth due to the amount of data that has to be sent between the server and all the clients who are connected to it.Types of game servers Game servers can be classified as listen servers and dedicated servers. Listen servers are run ...

Geodomain
The term geodomain refers to domain names that are the same as those of geographic entities, such as cities and countries. Examples of geodomains are Atlanta.com, LosAngeles.com, Texas.com, Spain.info and country specific names like Sverige.com. Since geographical names are limited in number, and have instant name recognition, geodomains are highly valued, with .com extension geodomains valued the most highly. Geodomains tend to provide a virtual representation of the locations they serve, for example, Hawaii.com is heavily tourism focused, while Syracuse.com and Madison.com have more local content. Collectively, geographic domain names are estimated to represent ...

GPL
The GNU General Public License (GNU GPL or simply GPL) is a widely used free software license, originally written by Richard Stallman for the GNU project. The GPL is the most popular and well-known example of the type of strong copyleft license that requires derived works to be available under the same copyleft. Under this philosophy, the GPL grants the recipients of a computer program the rights of the free software definition and uses copyleft to ensure the freedoms are preserved, even when the work is changed or added to. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD licenses are the standard examples.The GNU Lesser General Public ...

Guestbook
A guestbook is a logging system that allows visitors of a website to leave a public comment. Traditionally, the term applied to the actual ledgers held, for that same purpose, at B&Bs and museums.It is possible in some guestbooks for visitors to express their thoughts about the site or its subject. Generally, they do not require the poster to create a user account, as it is an informal method of dropping off a quick message. The purpose of a website guestbook is to display the kind of visitors the site gets, including the part of the world they reside in, and gain feedback from them. This allows the webmaster to assess and improve their site.A guestbook is generally a ...

Homepage
The homepage (often written as home page) is the URL or local file that automatically loads when a web browser starts and when the browser's "home" button is pressed. The term is also used to refer to the front page, webserver directory index, or main web page of a website of a group, company, organization, or individual. In some countries, such as Germany, Japan, and Korea, the term "homepage" commonly refers to a complete website (of a company or other organization) rather than to a single web ...

Hostname
A hostname (occasionally also, a sitename) is the unique name by which a network-attached device (which could consist of a computer, file server, network storage device, fax machine, copier, cable modem, etc.) is known on a network. The hostname is used to identify a particular host in various forms of electronic communication such as the World Wide Web, e-mail or Usenet.On the Internet, the terms "hostname" and "domain name" are often used interchangeably, but there are subtle technical differences between them.OverviewHostnames are used by various naming systems, NIS, DNS, SMB, etc., and so the meaning of the word hostname will vary depending on ...

IANA
The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) is the entity that oversees global IP address allocation, DNS root zone management, and other Internet protocol assignments. It is operated by ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers).Prior to the establishment of ICANN for this purpose, IANA was administered primarily by Jon Postel at the Information Sciences Institute at the University of Southern California, under a contract USC/ISI had with the United States Department of Defense, until ICANN was formed to assume the responsibility under a United States Department of Commerce contract.IANA's responsibilitiesIANA ...

ICANN
ICANN is the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. Headquartered in Marina Del Rey, California, ICANN is a California non-profit corporation that was created on September 18, 1998 in order to oversee a number of Internet-related tasks previously performed directly on behalf of the U.S. Government by other organizations, notably IANA.The tasks of ICANN include managing the assignment of domain names and IP addresses. To date, much of its work has concerned the introduction of new generic top-level domains. The technical work of ICANN is referred to as the IANA function; the rest of ICANN is mostly concerned with defining policy.On September 29, 2006, ICANN ...

IIS
Internet Information Services (IIS) - formerly called Internet Information Server - is a set of Internet-based services for servers created by Microsoft for use with Microsoft Windows. It is the world's second most popular web server in terms of overall websites, trailing far behind the industry leader Apache HTTP Server. As of June 2008 it served 35.39% of all websites according to Netcraft. The servers currently include FTP, SMTP, NNTP, and HTTP/HTTPS.Versions IIS 1.0, Windows NT 3.51 available as a free add-onIIS 2.0, Windows NT 4.0IIS 3.0, Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 3IIS 4.0, Windows NT 4.0 Option PackIIS ...

Imap
Internet Message Access Protocolhe Internet Message Access Protocol (commonly known as IMAP or IMAP4, and previously called Internet Mail Access Protocol, Interactive Mail Access Protocol (RFC 1064), and Interim Mail Access Protocol) is an application layer Internet protocol operating on port 143 that allows a local client to access e-mail on a remote server. The current version, IMAP version 4 revision 1 (IMAP4rev1), is defined by RFC 3501. IMAP4 and POP3 (Post Office Protocol version 3) are the two most prevalent Internet standard protocols for e-mail retrieval. Virtually all modern e-mail clients and servers support both.E-mail protocolsIMAP supports both connected ...

Internationalized Domain Name
internationalized domain name (IDN) is an Internet domain name that (potentially) contains non-ASCII characters. Such domain names could contain letters with diacritics, as required by many European languages, or characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. However, the standard for domain names does not allow such characters, and much work has gone into finding a way around this, either by changing the standard, or by agreeing on a way to convert internationalized domain names into standard ASCII domain names while preserving the stability of the domain name system.IDN has, by the standards of the Internet, a long history; it was originally proposed in ...

JavaScript
JavaScript is a scripting language most often used for client-side web development. Its proper name is ECMAScript, though "JavaScript" is much more commonly used. "JavaScript" is actually Netscape Communications Corporation's (and now the Mozilla Foundation's) implementation of the ECMAScript standard.JavaScript is a dynamic, weakly typed, prototype-based language with first-class functions. JavaScript was influenced by many languages and was designed to have a similar look to Java, but be easier for non-programmers to work with.The language is best known for its use in websites (as client-side JavaScript), but is also used to enable scripting access to objects embedded in other ...

Load Balancing
In computer networking, load balancing is a technique (usually performed by load balancers) to spread work between many computers, processes, hard disks or other resources in order to get optimal resource utilization and decrease computing time.Introduction A load balancer can be used to increase the capacity of a server farm beyond that of a single server. It can also allow the service to continue even in the face of server down time due to server failure or server maintenance.A load balancer consists of a virtual server (also referred to as vserver or VIP) which, in turn, consists of an IP address and port. This virtual server is bound to a number of physical ...

Perl
Perl is a high-level, general-purpose, interpreted, dynamic programming language. Perl was originally developed by Larry Wall, a linguist working as a systems administrator for NASA, in 1987, as a general purpose Unix scripting language to make report processing easier.Since then, it has undergone many changes and revisions and become widely popular among programmers. Larry Wall continues to oversee development of the core language, and its upcoming version, Perl 6.Perl borrows features from other programming languages including C, shell scripting (sh), AWK, and sed. The language provides powerful text processing facilities without the arbitrary data length limits of many ...

Remote backup service
A remote, online, or hosting managed backup service is a service that provides users with an online system for backing up and storing computer files on web hositng servers. Managed backup providers are companies that provide this type of service.Online backup systems are typically built around a client software program that runs on a schedule, typically once a day. This program collects, compresses, encrypts, and transfers the data to the remote backup service provider's servers. Other types of product are also available in the market, such as remote continuous data protection (CDP).Best Hosting Providers of this type of service frequently target ...

Reseller Hosting
Reseller hosting is a form of web hosting wherein the account owner has the ability to use his/her allotted hard drive space and bandwidth to host websites on behalf of third parties. The reseller purchases the host's services wholesale and then sells them to his customers for a profit. The certain portion of hard drive and bandwidth is allocated to reseller account. In order to achieve this the reseller can rent best dedicated server from a hosting company or resell shared hosting services. The reseller is simply given the permission to sell a certain amount of disk space and bandwidth to his own ...

Root Nameserver
A root name server is a DNS server that answers requests for the root namespace domain, and redirects requests for a particular top-level domain (TLD) to that TLD's nameservers. Although any local implementation of DNS can implement its own private root name servers, the term "root name server" is generally used to describe the thirteen well-known root name servers that implement the root namespace domain for the Internet's official global implementation of the Domain Name System.All domain names on the Internet can be regarded as ending in a full stop character e.g. "www.web-hosting-top.com.". This final dot is generally implied rather than explicit, as modern DNS software ...

Server Log
A server log is a log file (or several files) automatically created and maintained by a server of activity performed by it.A typical example is a web server log which maintains a history of page requests. The W3C maintains a standard format standard format for web server log files, but other proprietary formats exist. More recent entries are typically appended to the end of the file. Information about the request, including client IP address, request date/time, page requested, HTTP code, bytes served, user agent, and referer are typically added. These data can be combined into a single file, or separated into distinct ...

Shared Hosting
A shared web hosting service or virtual hosting service is a form of web hosting service where more than one instance of the same web server is hosted on a single physical server. This is generally the most economical option for hosting as many people share the overall cost of server maintenance.DescriptionThe hosting service must include system administration since it is shared by many users; this is a benefit for users who do not want to deal with it, but a hindrance to power users who want more control. In general shared hosting will be inappropriate for users who require extensive software development outside what the hosting provider ...

SpamAssassin
SpamAssassin is a computer program released under the Apache License 2.0 used for e-mail spam filtering based on content-matching rules, which also supports DNS-based, checksum-based and statistical filtering, supported by external programs and online databases.SpamAssassin is generally regarded as one of the most effective spam filters, especially when used in combination with spam databases. While simple text-matching alone may, for most users, be sufficient to correctly classify a majority of incoming mail the complexity involved in the combination of the comparison of words and symbols used in conjunction with the sources of spam may far exceed the average user's ...

SSL Certificate
Transport Layer Security (TLS) and its predecessor, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), are cryptographic protocols that provide secure communications on the Internet for such things as web browsing, e-mail, Internet faxing, instant messaging and other data transfers. There are slight differences between SSL and TLS, but the protocol remains substantially the same. The term "TLS" as used here applies to both protocols unless clarified by context.Description The TLS protocol allows applications to communicate across a network in a way designed to prevent eavesdropping, tampering, and message forgery. TLS provides endpoint authentication and communications ...

Subdomain
In the Domain Name System (DNS) hierarchy, a subdomain is a domain that is part of a larger domain. For example, "example.com" is a subdomain of the "com" top-level domain (TLD) while "www.example.com" is a service in the domain "example.com". In fact, the "com" TLD is a subdomain of the root domain, ".". The comparison with a disk drive containing files and folders is quite strong... something is a subdomain if it could be equated to a folder, and a record within that subdomain equates to a file.Relative to a subdomain, the larger domain that it is a part of is its parent domain, or alternately superdomain (the former term appears to be preferred by ...

Uniform Resource Locator
Uniform Resource Locator (URL), still also known as Universal Resource Locator, is a technical, Web-related term used in two distinct meanings: In popular usage and many technical documents, it is a synonym for Uniform Resource Identifier (URI); Strictly, the idea of a uniform syntax for global identifiers of network-retrievable documents was the core idea of the World Wide Web. In the early times, these identifiers were variously called "document names", "Web addresses" and "Uniform Resource Locators". These names were misleading, however, because not all identifiers were locators, and even for those that were, this was not their defining characteristic. ...

URL
Uniform Resource Locator (URL) formerly known as Universal Resource Locator,is a technical, Web-related term used in two distinct meanings: In popular usage, it is a widespread synonym for Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) - many popular and technical texts will use the term "URL" when referring to URI; Strictly, the idea of a uniform syntax for global identifiers of network-retrievable documents was the core idea of the World Wide Web. In the early times, these identifiers were variously called "document names", "Web addresses" and "Uniform Resource Locators". These names were misleading, however, because not all identifiers were locators, and even for those ...

Virtual Private Server
A virtual private server (also referred to as VPS or virtual server and abbreviated VDS) is a method of partitioning a physical server computer into multiple servers that each has the appearance and capabilities of running on its own dedicated machine. Each virtual server can run its own full-fledged operating system, and each server can be independently rebooted.The practice of partitioning a single server so that it appears as multiple servers has long been common practice in mainframe computers, but has seen a resurgence lately with the development of virtualization software and technologies for other architectures.OverviewThe physical server ...

Web document
Web document is a similar concept to web page, except it is a broader term with the following distinctions:Web page Web document Transfer protocol HTTP or HTTPS protocols. HTTP(S) or any other Internet communication protocol. Document format (X)HTML (X)HTML or any other type of valid MIME Content-Type, like an ISO OpenDocument. Context Page. Page, e-mail attachment, or many ...

Web page
A Web page or webpage is a resource of information that is suitable for the World Wide Web and can be accessed through a web browser. This information is usually in HTML or XHTML format, and may provide navigation to other web pages via hypertext links.Web pages may be retrieved from a local computer or from a remote web server (see best web hosting companies). The web server may restrict access only to a private network, e.g. a corporate intranet, or it may publish pages on the World Wide Web. Web pages are requested and served from web servers using Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).Web pages may consist of files of static text stored ...

Web template
A web template is an element of a web template system that is used to rapidly generate and mass-produce web pages through a pre-defined schematic, layout, or finite number of programming language instructions. In its simplest sense, a web template operates similarly to a form letter. "The basic task of a template processor is to output some amount of changeable data surrounded by unchanging data." One of the primary design principles used to justify the use of web templates is the "separation of presentation and content" and "presentation specifications" (in a web template), are combined (through the template engine) to mass-produce web documents.Basic conceptsA web ...

Website
A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN.A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP, a protocol that transfers information from the Web server to display in the user's Web browser.All publicly accessible websites are seen collectively as constituting the "World Wide Web".The pages of websites can usually be accessed from a common root URL called the homepage, and usually reside on the same physical server. The URLs of the pages organize them into a ...


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